OnePlus 3T and OnePlus Customer Service

With my 5 year plan for my Nexus 4 coming to and soon I have kept an eye out on the latest handsets. Now that the Nexus line is discontinued, I am on the look out for something of similar value. The Nexus 4 was fantastic value at the time and I considered a bargain at £279. However, prices seemed to have jumped now, with the successor to Nexus, Google Pixel having starting price of £599.

I had been hearing lots of good things about the OnePlus 3t, so after months of on and of thinking I decided to give it a go. I’m not going to publish specs, photos or detailed analysis here because there is loads of that elsewhere. I was impressed, I found it a lovely phone, blazingly quick with a fast and accurate fingerprint sensor. It installed my apps so fast that my notifications could not keep up, by the time I was informed an app was successfully installed the next one was already downloaded and installing. This also was my first 4G phone and I am blessed with good coverage at home and work, so when I was off wifi it was impressive compared to my 3G connection on the Nexus 4.

However a few things came to light that I could not get over. The first was the size. I started going out without the phone, because it was just too big to be safe in my trouser pocket. I found myself keeping it in my backpack when out and about, and even there, it would not fit in the purpose built pocket. I also found that I was afraid of using it outside, just in case I dropped it. Now I can tell you that my Nexus 4 has been through the wars and has been dropped from my hands more than a few times when out and about. More to me being a clumsy What was the result: nothing. It still works and looks great. I got the impression if I dropped the OnePlus 3t it would shatter. Plus who wants to drop a £450+ device.

I sat down with the OnePlus 3t and it suddenly dawned on me. What exactly can this phone do that my old one could not? Yes it was faster but my Nexus 4 in reality was not exactly slow on opening apps. Yes the new phone had a fingerprint sensor, but was this really that an important a factor. I’d never had a problem with a pin or pattern before. My Nexus 4 battery is dying and is comparitively a dinasor at charging compared to the OnePlus 3t however I had adapted. I have a replacement battery ready to go in, I have a charger with me at all times, I have a wireless charger I place it on when I’m not using it at home and I have the option of carrying a portable battery with me.

I will make a point to say that I was impressed with OnePlus customer service. They offer a 15 day no hassle return on the phone and within 24 hours of me returning the phone via UPS from England to Poland not only had they received and processed the return but they had issued my refund. I was worried due to OnePlus receiving a lot of negative customer service comments but I could not be more happy with the service I received. If OnePlus ever release a smaller handset I will certainly be looking at them more positively.

Nexus 4 – The 5 Year Plan

LG Nexus 4This would have been much better if I had written this at the start of my plan, instead of over half way through it. I could have detailed my research and thoughts and how I came to my decisions. But to be honest today most of that information would have been out of date and of no use for today. Next time then.

I started thinking about how long I use devices when I was considering purchasing a smart phone at the end of 2012. When I was growing up technology was moving so fast that upgrading computers, mobile phones and other devices became habit. I often sold components and devices on, gave things away or stuck them in a cupboard never to see daylight again. Previously I had often opted for mobile phone contracts which came with the latest and greatest phone featuring new at the time features such as a colour screen, 3G, touchscreen, WiFi radio etc.

This purchase was going to be an expensive business and I worked out the monthly cost, looking at contract and purchasing the device on its own. I then started to think about the environmental impact of my choices. Changing mobile phone every few years can’t be good for my pocket or the environment. I’m into technology and like to have things not just for the sake of having them but for things which will make some contribution to my life.

I came to the conclusion that if I was going to get a smart phone it would have to serve its purpose for five years. That’s a long time in technological terms and I knew I would have to choose wisely. I did not only have to think in terms of specifications and physical durability, I had to think in terms of software. How long would the software be supported and updated? A hard question to answer. I had been bitten before when I chose a HP Pre 3 running WebOS; A a great phone and OS unfortunately abandoned very quickly on launch by HP.

My choice: The Nexus 4

In the end I chose the Nexus 4 smartphone brought out by Google and LG. It was generously priced and the specifications beyond what I had thought achievable given my budget. For Android I thought that with it receiving Android updates directly from Google it would be well supported for. Obviously today the phone is outclassed by newer hardware but the software is still updated by Google. It does not have a usable 4G radio but at the moment 3G and WiFi serves my needs.

I know that I’ve been very lucky that the Nexus 4 has been supported in terms of software updates for this long. It’s been over two and a half years since I first got my Nexus 4 – the hard part is still to come.